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Christian Fiction Scavenger Hunt Stop #25

Updated: Mar 13



Welcome to the Christian Fiction Scavenger Hunt! If you’ve just discovered the hunt, be sure to start at Stop #1, and collect the clues through all the stops, in order, so you can enter to win one of our top 5 grand prizes!


·  The hunt BEGINS on 3/14 at noon MST with Stop #1 at LisaTawnBergren.com.

·  Hunt through our loop using Chrome or Firefox as your browser (not Explorer).

·  There is NO RUSH to complete the hunt—you have all weekend (until Sunday, 3/17 at midnight MST)! So take your time, reading the unique posts along the way; our hope is that you discover new authors/new books and learn new things about them.

·  Submit your entry for the grand prizes by collecting the CLUE on each author’s scavenger hunt post and submitting your answer in the Rafflecopter form at the final stop, back on Lisa’s site. Many authors are offering additional prizes along the way!


Hi! My name’s T.I. Lowe. I’m a country girl who works barefooted. Well, except for book events. I’ll put shoes on for those. I love, love storytelling and daydreaming, so being an author fits me better than any pair of shoes! You can learn more about me and all my books here on my site and on Facebook, TikTok, and Instagram.


My newest release is a contemporary southern romance—INDIGO ISLE. Here’s what it’s about:



JOURNEY OF INDIGO



One of my favorite parts of the story process is the research and learning something new. Indigo Isle has to be the top book for me because of the research. I was fortunate with being able to attend an indigo workshop, where I was able to get my hands dirty—blue actually. I loved it from start to finish.


We began the day by pruning sections of indigo stems that were over six feet tall. It made my skin itch a little, reminding me of gathering fresh okra. If you know, you know.



After we stripped the leaves off the long stems, placing them in a mason jar with water, and then, while the jars steeped in boiling pots to extract the dye, we were educated on the plant and its history in our state. Hands-on education at its finest. Then we spent the afternoon learning the art of shibori, folding silk scarves and dyeing them with the dark-blue dye we extracted from the leaves.


I’ve reflected a lot on how our life’s journey is similar to the journey if indigo. There are many chapters to our story and the beginning may start out the way we plan, but the outcome rarely looks like what we have envisioned. No one really likes unexpected change, I know I don’t. I’m like an old hen set in my ways and when change happens I just want to pitch a hissy fit. Oh, how I’ve learned the hard way that this only makes things worse.

In the midst of difficulty and change, it’s hard to see anything else. It’s also not easy to be patient while enduring this, but I’ve come out on the other side of some pretty hard times and I’m always at awe with the way God was at work in it. Though life may not look the way I’d imagined, there’s still beauty to be found if I take a closer look.

 


Here’s the Stop #25 Basics:

If you’re interested, you can order INDIGO ISLE on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Tyndale House, or at your local bookstore!

Clue to Write Down: from.

Link to Stop #26, the Next Stop on the Loop: Morgan Busse’s site!


WAIT! Before you go, I have a gift! Click here for your FREE book!

And if you like giveaways, be sure to sign up for my monthly newsletter.



 

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12 Comments


Phyllis Rollan
Phyllis Rollan
Mar 18

I think that this workshop would be a lot of fun! I have been trying to get back to my southern roots through gardening, canning, making sourdough, jams….I love the history! I have this book and can’t wait to read it!!

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T. I. Lowe
T. I. Lowe
Mar 18
Replying to

It was so very fun. I would love to attend another. I hope you enjoy the book!

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Lisa Hudson
Lisa Hudson
Mar 17

Your books are always blessings!

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T. I. Lowe
T. I. Lowe
Mar 18
Replying to

Aww. Thank you!

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marymcgX
Mar 17

Was the dyeing similar to how one tie dyes? Those are some very pretty scarves.

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T. I. Lowe
T. I. Lowe
Mar 17
Replying to

Yes. It’s exactly like tie dying. We folded the scarves and used twine and rubber bands to secure it. Very fun!

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Sue Boggs
Sue Boggs
Mar 17

I'd of thought it was more difficult to get the dye.

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T. I. Lowe
T. I. Lowe
Mar 17
Replying to

The plant grows right here in South Carolina. It takes a lot of leaves to produce a small amount of pigment. But the rich color is so worth it.

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Elizabeth L
Elizabeth L
Mar 15

It's such a beautiful color! I'd have never know that's how the dye was made.

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T. I. Lowe
T. I. Lowe
Mar 17
Replying to

Isn’t it such an interesting process? I’ve wondered how someone ever figured it out. Did they steep the leaves thinking it would be similar to tea but then the water turned blue!

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